Top Five Dog Bite Prevention Tips

As it’s National Dog Bite Prevention Week, I feel obligated to share my top methods by which canine aficionados can avoid some of the personal, emotional, and financial trauma associated with incidents where our canine companions’ teeth penetrate another animal or person’s skin.

According to the AVMA Dog Bite Prevention webpage:

4.7 million people the U.S. are bitten by dogs on an annual basis

800,000 Americans receive medical attention for dog bites each year

Children are most commonly bitten, …

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Dogs in the News – Dog Rescued from Frozen River Bites Anchor Woman during TV Interview

 

Max, a large Dogo Argentino was chasing a coyote across the icy Smith Reservoir in Lakewood, Colorado on  Tuesday, when he fell into the water. A West Metro firefighter, donning a wetsuit, braved the chilly waters and pulled the dog to safety. The rescue was captured by the SKYFox helicopters.  Max and the fireman were being interviewed by KUSA anchor Kyle Dyer on Thursday, when Max suddenly bit her on her face as she leaned in. Prior to this point, Max had been friendly. Kyle was taken to the hospital and has undergone reconstructive surgery on her face.

This tragic incident does bring home the warning that any animal can bite at any time. Max did give a warning snarl before the bite but there was little time for the anchor woman to react. Even professionals that work around animals on a daily basis can still be caught off guard and receive the painful bite from a dog or cat. There are certain signals that dogs do display before a bite and there are ways to approach dogs to avoid a confrontation. All parents should teach their children dog bite safety. A previous post on avoiding dog bites will help you to understand how to avoid dog bites.

Max was being evaluated at the Denver Animal Shelter where he will be quarantined for 10 days to ensure he does not have rabies, the shelter’s director said.

“Kyle is concerned about the viewers who may have been watching the interview and wants everyone to know she is okay.”

Let this be a lesson to all of us to be more careful around dogs, especially dogs you do not know well and are in unfamiliar settings.

Tips to Avoid Dog Bites

Almost on a daily basis, a news story pertaining to a dog bite victim is noticed on the night time tv news. City and state governments struggle with how to implement aggressive dog laws. Wouldn’t it be much easier if we can understand how to stop dog bites totally?

According to the Centers for Disease Control almost five million dog bites are documented every single year and much more than 800,000 of those bites needed medical attention. Estimates from insurance corporations and hospitals range as high as $250 million dollars spent annually on the treatment of dog bites. Provided that the the vast majority of dogs are euthanized on account of behavior issues, this is definitely an issue that not only influences humans, but can, really certainly, have an effect on puppies in an extremely damaging way.

Should you read by means of the Bureau of Labor Statistics web site, you may well be inclined to think that operating with pets can be a really harmful proposition. In the course of a six year study, a lot more than 18,000 injuries or illnesses were noted involving dogs or cats and 8 of those occurrences had been fatal. An remarkable truth though is veterinarians and veterinary staff accounted for less than 5% of the total, despite their apparent closeness with their patients. What secrets and techniques can this profession teach us about steering clear of these injuries as well as the associated costs?

Based on Dr. Kersti Seksel, a noted animal behaviorist and veterinarian from Australia, puppies will usually present a lot of warning signs before attempting to bite. “It is important to look at the whole dog, its body language as well as its facial expression,” says Dr. Seksel. “A dog may growl, bark menacingly, lift its lips and grimace. The body is often tense, the hackles along the back and neck may be raised indicating a heightened state of arousal, and the tail may be slowly wagging.”

Due to the substantial numbers of puppies seen on a everyday basis, veterinary staff members have discovered to monitor a dog’s body language, preparing for virtually any possible aggressive movement. And although that is essential information to understand, Dr. Seksel cautions everyone to remember that a lot of of these signs can be subtle and there are occasions when a puppy may not give the typical signals. A pertinent illustration might be the dog who has been previously punished for growling. As Pavlov along with other behaviorists have shown, puppies will learn avoidance if negative stimuli are used immediately after specific behaviors. Therefore, a dog owner who reprimands his puppy for growling may be unknowingly eliminating the dog’s only outward expression of emotion or displeasure.

Veterinary experts recommend that all puppies undergo an initial “puppy training class” and socialization exercises. Just like children, some puppies will instantly take to their new friends and some will take a little longer to overcome their shyness. Unless the dog is going to be used for police or military work, no puppy need to receive positive reinforcement for any kind of aggressive behavior. Owners have to seek veterinary assistance when considering buying a breed of puppy they may be unfamiliar with or in the event the description from the breed discusses “extreme loyalty”, “intolerant of children”, or “prefers single owner household”.

As a final point, an crucial component of keeping away from dog bites is the training of our youngsters. The substantial majority of puppy bites happen in young children 4-9 years of age along with a larger percentage happens in young boys. Educating your little ones some with the subsequent suggestions could enable to stop a painful lesson and possibly even save his or her life. When faced with an unknown dog, or perhaps a puppy whose behavior would seem to be odd, Dr. Seksel recommends the following:

# don’t approach the dog

# look at your feet or even the ground – do not make eye contact with the dog

# stand still – do not run in the event the dog approaches

# stay quiet- do not holler or yell at the dog

# please do not try pat any dog on the head

Youngsters need to be taught to under no circumstances run up on the dog, especially one who’s eating and that not every puppy could be as friendly as their own dog. Educating a child to check with the pet dog owner if it can be ok to approach the puppy after which if it’s ok to pet him can help to avoid many of the frequent mistakes made by dog bite victims.

As dog owners, we enjoy our pets and want the very best for them. Animal shelters and humane societies would like to see the number of puppies euthanized for behavior concerns decrease and our society, like a whole, includes a strong wish to see a reduction in the amount of pet dog bites every year. Using the recommendations of veterinary behaviorists and other animal experts may be the first excellent step to reaching these goals.

In case you are having difficulty with your dog and aggression, please see your veterinarian right away.story

Rabies Remains A Worldwide Threat!

Rabies! Instantly we picture a wild animal or even a domestic dog, foam slathering from its mouth as it prepares to attack. This killer virus raises its head every year always waiting for an opportunity to strike. Modern medicine has come close to eradicating this disease, but it’s not gone yet!

In North America, we are extremely lucky. Vaccinations have practically eliminated the threat of rabies from our domestic animals.

Ongoing programs using oral rabies vaccines for wildlife are attempting to halt the spread of rabies among raccoons, skunks and foxes. Texas has concentrated the program of baiting the oral rabies vaccines in the counties along the border of Mexico with great success.

But if we have done such a great job, then why should we continue to be concerned and vaccinate our pets? Are we still in danger from our ancient foe?

The simple answer is a resounding YES!

According to the Alliance for Rabies Control, 55,000 people die from rabies each year around the world, mainly in Asia and Africa – an unfortunate statistic – because with appropriate medical care, rabies in humans is 100% preventable.

An even sadder fact is a large percentage of deaths are children. More than 100 children die from rabies worldwide every day. Overall, one person is killed by this disease every 10 minutes!

Rabies is a viral disease that can affect any warm-blooded animal; however, our close association with dogs brings this killer home to our families.

After development of an effective vaccination program for our pets and a post-exposure rabies vaccine for people, rabies cases in humans began to drop significantly in Western countries.

Within the last decade, less than three-dozen people have died from rabies in the United States. The majority of these deaths were attributable to bat or dog bites from outside the United States. This dramatic decrease has prompted the CDC to announce canine rabies is “extinct” in the U.S.

“There are many people today who remember rabid dogs in the streets of their neighborhoods,” says Dr. Sandy Norman, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health. She warns that pet owners should continue vaccinating their pets, especially in light of the CDC announcement.

“It is only through continued vigilance that we will maintain that status,” she says. “There is a huge reservoir of rabies among wildlife and it is not unimaginable that those strains could infect our pets.”

Additionally, world travel could allow someone to unknowingly bring home a rabid pet. Recently, several British animal rescuers underwent prophylactic rabies vaccines. A puppy imported from Sri Lanka bit all of them and later, was found to be rabid.

Here in the United States, more than 20,000 prophylactic doses of human rabies vaccines are given annually.

To help keep this disease in the public eye, the Alliance for Rabies Control, a charity created in the United Kingdom, enacted World Rabies Day. The goal is to eradicate terrestrial rabies as quickly as possible.

World Rabies Day, held each September, is designed to raise awareness and help people understand how they can help eliminate this threat.

Four hundred thousand people from around the world participated in the first World Rabies Day in an effort to raise knowledge and understanding. Additionally, leading U.S. veterinary associations and pharmaceutical companies, like Merial and Novartis are all contributing to the cause.

Keeping yourself safe from rabies is easy by following a few simple steps:

First, follow your veterinarian’s guidelines as well as your local ordinances with regards to vaccinating your pet. Laws vary from state to state so be sure you understand your responsibility.

Second, avoid contact with wildlife. Rabies still exists in wild animals. Never attempt to remove a wild animal from your property without professional help.

Be especially wary of bats. Most human rabies cases in North America are the result of a bat bite.

Finally, the Alliance asks that you tell your friends how rabies impacts lives around the world. Encourage neighbors and fellow pet owners to vaccinate all of their pets.

Rabies can be controlled and potentially even eliminated in many parts of the world, but as Dr. Norman says, “Continued vigilance is essential.”

Rabies Update- Still World Wide Threat

Rabies! Instantly we picture a wild animal or even a domestic dog, foam slathering from its mouth as it prepares to attack. This killer virus raises its head every year always waiting for an opportunity to strike. Modern medicine has come close to eradicating this disease, but it’s not gone yet!

In North America, we are extremely lucky. Vaccinations have practically eliminated the threat of rabies from our domestic animals.

Ongoing programs using oral rabies vaccines for wildlife are attempting to halt the spread of rabies among raccoons, skunks and foxes.

But if we have done such a great job, then why should we continue to be concerned and vaccinate our pets? Are we still in danger from our ancient foe?

The simple answer is a resounding YES!

According to the Alliance for Rabies Control, 55,000 people die from rabies each year around the world, mainly in Asia and Africa – an unfortunate statistic – because with appropriate medical care, rabies in humans is 100% preventable.

An even sadder fact is a large percentage of deaths are children. More than 100 children die from rabies worldwide every day. Overall, one person is killed by this disease every 10 minutes!

Rabies is a viral disease that can affect any warm-blooded animal; however, our close association with dogs brings this killer home to our families.

After development of an effective vaccination program for our pets and a post-exposure rabies vaccine for people, rabies cases in humans began to drop significantly in Western countries.

Within the last decade, less than three-dozen people have died from rabies in the United States. The majority of these deaths were attributable to bat or dog bites from outside the United States. This dramatic decrease has prompted the CDC to announce canine rabies is “extinct” in the U.S.

“There are many people today who remember rabid dogs in the streets of their neighborhoods,” says Dr. Sandy Norman, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health. She warns that pet owners should continue vaccinating their pets, especially in light of the CDC announcement.

“It is only through continued vigilance that we will maintain that status,” she says. “There is a huge reservoir of rabies among wildlife and it is not unimaginable that those strains could infect our pets.”

Additionally, world travel could allow someone to unknowingly bring home a rabid pet. Recently, several British animal rescuers underwent prophylactic rabies vaccines. A puppy imported from Sri Lanka bit all of them and later, was found to be rabid.

Here in the United States, more than 20,000 prophylactic doses of human rabies vaccines are given annually.

To help keep this disease in the public eye, the Alliance for Rabies Control, a charity created in the United Kingdom, enacted World Rabies Day. The goal is to eradicate terrestrial rabies as quickly as possible.

World Rabies Day, held each September, is designed to raise awareness and help people understand how they can help eliminate this threat.

Four hundred thousand people from around the world participated in the first World Rabies Day in an effort to raise knowledge and understanding. Additionally, leading U.S. veterinary associations and pharmaceutical companies, like Merial and Novartis are all contributing to the cause.

Keeping yourself safe from rabies is easy by following a few simple steps:

First, follow your veterinarian’s guidelines as well as your local ordinances with regards to vaccinating your pet. Laws vary from state to state so be sure you understand your responsibility.

Second, avoid contact with wildlife. Rabies still exists in wild animals. Never attempt to remove a wild animal from your property without professional help.

Be especially wary of bats. Most human rabies cases in North America are the result of a bat bite.

Finally, the Alliance asks that you tell your friends how rabies impacts lives around the world. Encourage neighbors and fellow pet owners to vaccinate all of their pets.

Rabies can be controlled and potentially even eliminated in many parts of the world, but as Dr. Norman says, “Continued vigilance is essential.”