Emergencies

In Case of an Emergency

In the event of an emergency during our normal office hours please call ahead if possible and proceed directly to our practice.

For after hour emergencies, we advise that you contact one of the pet emergency centers shown below.

Accidental poisonings-Call ASPCA Poison Hotline – (888) 426-4435 click here for more information

North Houston Veterinary Specialists Call 832-616-5000

1646 Spring Cypress Rd, Suite 100
Spring, TX 77388
www.nhvetspecialists.com

Animal Emergency Clinic NE

10205 Birchridge
Humble,
Texas
77338

United States

Phone : (281)446-4900

Interactive Map :
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Animal Emergency Clinic NE
Located on 10205 Birchridge behind the Deerbrook Mall shopping center,
kitten

Animal Poison Control Center

As the premier animal poison control center in North America, the APCC is your best resource for any animal poison-related emergency, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If you think that your pet may have ingested a potentially poisonous substance, make the call that can make all the difference: (888) 426-4435.

A $65 consultation fee may be applied to your credit card.

What To Do If Your Pet Is Poisoned

Don’t panic. Rapid response is important, but panicking can interfere with the process of helping your pet.

Take 30 to 60 seconds to safely collect and have at hand any material involved. This may be of great benefit to your vet and/or APCC toxicologists, as they determine what poison or poisons are involved. In the event that you need to take your pet to a local veterinarian, be sure to take the product’s container with you. Also, collect in a sealable plastic bag any material your pet may have vomited or chewed.
– If you witness your pet consuming material that you suspect might be toxic, do not hesitate to seek emergency assistance, even if you do not notice any adverse effects. Sometimes, even if poisoned, an animal may appear normal for several hours or for days after the incident.
Call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center

The telephone number is (888) 426-4435. There is a $60 consultation fee for this service.

Be ready with the following information:

– the species, breed, age, sex, weight and number of animals involved

– the animal’s symptoms

– information regarding the exposure, including the agent (if known), the amount of the agent involved and the time elapsed since the time of exposure.

Have the product container/packaging available for reference.

Please note: If your animal is having seizures, losing consciousness, is unconscious or is having difficulty breathing, telephone ahead and bring your pet immediately to your local veterinarian or emergency veterinary clinic. If necessary, he or she may call the APCC.
Be Prepared

Keep the telephone number of the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center—(888) 426-4435—as well as that of your local veterinarian, in a prominent location.
Invest in an emergency first-aid kit for your pet. The kit should contain:

– a fresh bottle of hydrogen peroxide, 3 percent USP (to induce vomiting)

– a turkey baster, bulb syringe or large medicine syringe (to administer peroxide)

– saline eye solution

– artificial tear gel (to lubricate eyes after flushing)

– mild grease-cutting dish washing liquid (for bathing an animal after skin contamination)

– forceps (to remove stingers)

– a muzzle (to protect against fear- or excitement-induced biting)

– a can of your pet’s favorite wet food

-a pet carrier
Always consult a veterinarian or the APCC for directions on how and when to use any emergency first-aid item

Ten Most Common Poisonous Plants

Marijuana
Ingestion of Cannabis sativa by companion animals can result in depression of the central nervous system and incoordination, as well as vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, increased heart rate, and even seizures and coma.

Sago Palm
All parts of Cycas Revoluta are poisonous, but the seeds or “nuts” contain the largest amount of toxin. The ingestion of just one or two seeds can result in very serious effects, which include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, seizures and liver failure.

Lilies
Members of the Lilium spp. are considered to be highly toxic to cats. While the poisonous component has not yet been identified, it is clear that with even ingestions of very small amounts of the plant, severe kidney damage could result.

Tulip/Narcissus bulbs

The bulb portions of Tulipa/Narcissus spp. contain toxins that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation, drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and cardiac abnormalities.

Azalea/Rhododendron
Members of the Rhododenron spp. contain substances known as grayantoxins, which can produce vomiting, drooling, diarrhea, weakness and depression of the central nervous system in animals. Severe azalea poisoning could ultimately lead to coma and death from cardiovascular collapse.

Oleander
All parts of Nerium oleander are considered to be toxic, as they contain cardiac glycosides that have the potential to cause serious effects—including gastrointestinal tract irritation, abnormal heart function, hypothermia and even death.

Castor Bean
The poisonous principle in Ricinus communis is ricin, a highly toxic protein that can produce severe abdominal pain, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, weakness and loss of appetite. Severe cases of poisoning can result in dehydration, muscle twitching, tremors, seizures, coma and death.

Cyclamen

Cylamen species contain cyclamine, but the highest concentration of this toxic component is typically located in the root portion of the plant. If consumed, Cylamen can produce significant gastrointestinal irritation, including intense vomiting. Fatalities have also been reported in some cases.

Kalanchoe

This plant contains components that can produce gastrointestinal irritation, as well as those that are toxic to the heart, and can seriously affect cardiac rhythm and rate.

Yew

Taxus spp. contains a toxic component known as taxine, which causes central nervous system effects such as trembling, incoordination, and difficulty breathing. It can also cause significant gastrointestinal irritation and cardiac failure, which can result in death.

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